David Cater

as-cool-as-an-attempted-suicide:

wallflowerbloom:

No matter what anybody tells you, words and ideas can change the world.

We don’t read and write poetry because it’s cute. We read and write poetry because we are members of the human race. And the human race is filled with passion. And medicine, law, business, engineering, these are noble pursuits and necessary to sustain life. But poetry, beauty, romance, love, these are what we stay alive for.

(Dead Poets Society, 1989)

Me

(via marykatewiles)

150dollars:

kissedbyatroll:

I love how he just catches her

i love how he did what he was supposed to do. i love how he didn’t powerbomb her through the ice and smash her spine into several pieces. i ship it.

150dollars:

kissedbyatroll:

I love how he just catches her

i love how he did what he was supposed to do. i love how he didn’t powerbomb her through the ice and smash her spine into several pieces. i ship it.

(via kayleemb)

Joss Whedon’s Personal Top 10 Episodes of Buffy (x)

(Source: lisathevampireslayer, via elisa-t)

a-p-h-belarus:

phrux:

adamsforthought:

dungeonsandpendragons:

Commonly confused medieval weapons, a powerpoint by me.

Now stop screwing them up, seriously, or I will put a medieval weapon in your head.

Tumblr is endearing me to being lectured at in Comic Sans

THIS is a WAR SCYTHE, a scythe actually used in combat. Notice it is not a useless piece of shit and is an actual functional weapon.

The only reason why death is pictured with a FARMING scythe is because he harvests souls.

now i can kill ppl and know what im killing them with thank you

(Source: redandveryverydarkgray, via fizzylimon)

theeverythingfangirl:

Spock concludes this to be highly illogical, and he is done.

(via would-you-like-a-jelly-baby)

you-wish-you-had-this-url asked: I've been seeing a lot of people talk about Gus sounding really pretentious in the movie, do you think he sounds pretentious?

fishingboatproceeds:

I mean, that scene is word-for-word from the book, so don’t blame the movie! :) Yes, Gus is super pretentious at the start of the story. it’s a character flaw.

Gus wants to have a big and important and remembered life, and so he acts like he imagines people who have such lives act. So he’s, like, says-soliloquy-when-he-means-monologue pretentious, which is the most pretentious variety of pretension in all the world.

And then his performative, over-the-top, hyper-self-aware pretentiousness must fall away for him to really connect to Hazel, just as her fear of being a grenade must fall away. That’s what the novel is about. That is its plot.

Gus must make the opposite of the traditional heroic journey—he must start out strong and end up weak in order to reimagine what constitutes a rich and well-lived life.

Basically, a 20-second clip from the first five minutes of a movie is not the movie.

(Standard acknowledgement here that I might be wrong, that I am inevitably defensive of TFIOS, that it has many flaws, that there’s nothing wrong with critical discussion, and that a strong case could be made that I should not insert myself into these conversations at all.)

“Two things define you. Your patience when you have nothing, and your attitude when you have everything.”
— (via realizes)

(via marykatewiles)

musictoasoul:

tfios-changed-my-life:

tito-burritto:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realize it. 

You sound like an English teacher. Unless you are John Green, i’m going to guess half of that is probably just in your head and the metaphor was simply that, a metaphor. Though if I am actually wrong, then I apologize.

Actually, pretty much all of this has been said by John Green himself, and, I’m not sure if you’ve read the book, but there is plenty of evidence for all of this in the book.

The fact that people are getting hateful because of that scene, which is basically a scene right out of the book, means you either just want to complain about something to seem smart and above the rest of us, or because you really didn’t understand the book.
^This person explained it perfectly.

Are people also forgetting that John Green was present for the majority of the filming process? All the scenes were filmed with his approval because that was how he wrote it in the first place. If Augustus wasn’t intended to be as this, then John would have said otherwise during filming.

musictoasoul:

tfios-changed-my-life:

tito-burritto:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realize it. 

You sound like an English teacher. Unless you are John Green, i’m going to guess half of that is probably just in your head and the metaphor was simply that, a metaphor. Though if I am actually wrong, then I apologize.

Actually, pretty much all of this has been said by John Green himself, and, I’m not sure if you’ve read the book, but there is plenty of evidence for all of this in the book.

The fact that people are getting hateful because of that scene, which is basically a scene right out of the book, means you either just want to complain about something to seem smart and above the rest of us, or because you really didn’t understand the book.

^This person explained it perfectly.

Are people also forgetting that John Green was present for the majority of the filming process? All the scenes were filmed with his approval because that was how he wrote it in the first place. If Augustus wasn’t intended to be as this, then John would have said otherwise during filming.

(via unashamedlyshameful)

Elsa has sex for the first time

kyliesparks27:

lacigreen:

onthewing:

anxietyblogger:

dengarde:

I was collecting the voice files from Disney Infinity when I noticed that Elsa’s are arranged and performed in a rather…amusing way.

Performed by Idina Menzel herself

im crying

What the fuck

???? uuuummmmm

what magic is this

She wasn’t afraid to let herself go.

meganeincubator:

I’m reblogging this solely for the corgi.

(Source: iraffiruse, via littlemorethananerd)